47radar

ARTIST NAME: 47radar

 

SONG TITLE: I Am Love

 

SOCIAL MEDIA
Facebook

 

Twitter

 

Instagram

 

SONG LINK

iTunes

SoundCloud

Spotify

 

BIOGRAPHY
47radar grew up as sort of a child prodigy in school. Unnaturally gifted and highly intelligent, he was a chronic daydreamer and didn’t find school interesting at all. His mother says that, when he was in kindergarten, he would finish his work before his classmates and then attempt to help them finish theirs. His teachers didn’t know exactly how to deal with him but often found creative ways to keep him occupied and challenged. As he grew older, he realized he could do just enough to get by and would often slack most of the school year until it was time for final exams – and then he would ace the exams. This drove both his mother and teachers crazy as they knew what he was capable of. His head was definitely in the clouds. How else could he become a master of all trades? Equally gifted at audio mixing, production, songwriting, and singing – and extremely passionate about all of it. As he grew older, he learned to channel his scattered energy into art. His musical style is just as varied as his skill sets. From dreamy, romantic ballads…to 8-bit video game synth pop…to one man A Capella (he can sing bass, too!). Emotional intensity is his specialty.

 

Interview

 

Discuss your personality.

There’s not enough space on the internet for that.  I guess I’m a master of being a jack of all trades? This sounds arrogant but it’s true.  It’s the way I’ve had to survive and the way I create music. I have to do it all on a high level or it becomes a failure.  To keep it as basic as possible, I’m definitely a friendly person. I’m driven by how things work – from the cogs and gears of a machine to the core psychology of a person (or animal).  I’m a digger. I dig deep to find out what’s under the mask – that includes myself! I’m still digging through my own mask trying to pinpoint that specific soul source that is ‘Me’. So far I like what I’m seeing.  I think…

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Discuss your existence as a musician.
My existence as a musician is something I’m only beginning to fully understand.  I feel that my purpose in life is to express myself and my experiences – as well as the experiences of others that I’ve come into contact with – to the best of my ability in hopes that someone hears it and finds hope.  I’ve found that the best way to do this is to be intellectual about it without overthinking it. BALANCE. That is my driving philosophy. Balance in everything is peace within that thing. Whatever that thing may be. Unless it’s pizza.  There’s no balance in pizza. Eat as much as you can as often as you can.

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Go into details on the changes in your life for choosing music as a career.
The constraints of space-time have failed me yet again!  To put it simply, music and life are one in the same. I mean that both lyrically and metaphorically.  Music isn’t something I do. It’s an expression of what I live. Life is just a story told from billions of different points of view.  Music is just one way for me to express mine.

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Tell us the benefits and drawbacks of choosing music as a career.

The benefits are what you make them.  It really depends on who you are and what your purpose is.  For me, the benefit is having a living, breathing, journal that comes from the thoughts and emotions inside my mind and heart.  The best part of THAT is when it helps people navigate their own journey. The feedback I get in that regard is incredible! To know that you helped someone you’ve never met, seen, nor physically touched.  That’s beyond amazing to me.

 

The drawbacks are also dependent on the person.  For me, there haven’t been any. Like anybody else, I have my fair share of obstacles but when I trace them to their source, they’re never rooted in music.  Always something else.

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Tell us how you will manage fame as an established artist.
Honestly, fame is not something I’m looking to achieve BUT I understand that it’s a necessary part of what I do.  If I’m to be successful in my mission, the fame is inevitable. It’s actually necessary in order to expand my reach.  It enables me to touch many times more people than I could otherwise. I’ve had flashes of it in my career before. I’ve had to sign album covers and attend dinner parties in my honor.  It’s all good experience and adds to my story but it can never be the foundation of one’s life. It’s not solid. It’s not the key to happiness that many people think it is. I’d handle it responsibly.  I’d use it as a tool in my Toolbox of Life. Can I copyright that phrase?
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Elaborate on the storyline of this song.

The song is really just a riddle.  It’s the true form of love – NOT attachment, romanticism, or infatuation – but the core essence of love revealing itself to you in clues and asking if you’ve figured it out yet.  Eventually it reveals itself just in case you might still be wondering by the end of the song. It’s unconditional love. If you’re religious you might call it the Love of God. If spiritual, you might call it Universal Source.  If you’re a Star Wars fan, you might call it The Force! It’s all really the same thing.

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Tell us the means of connecting you and purchasing your music online.
iTunes, Spotify, SoundCloud, Deezer, Tidal and about 50 other online outlets that I can’t even remember.  I’m pretty much on all known music stores that exist – at least the legitimate ones. If you use it, I’m probably there.  Just search for 47radar. You’re not going to find anyone else with that name, that’s for sure! If you do, let me know so I can send my non-existent army to shut them down.

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Let us know the greatest moment of your music career.
ANY moment in which I receive testimony from my fans stating how my song or songs have helped them or changed their lives.  And it’s not an ego inflation thing. I’m genuinely touched and amazed that something I created could have such an impact on a person.  Even though, that’s my motivation for creating, you never really know that it’s working until you hear it from someone. It further strengthens my resolve and commitment to keep doing what I’m doing.  More fuel to the fire.

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Share your press release and reviews with us.
Here’s the thing about that.  Though I’m new to many people, I’ve actually been making music for about 20 years now.  The press kit thing is something I did back in my rookie days because I was told that labels required that.  I’m a little more experienced in the business now and press kits for me, at this point, are kind of silly. I keep an updated bio for those who care to read it but I don’t have a press kit and probably never will again.

As for reviews, It’s been a while since I kept up with those because, these days, I only focus on what I get directly from fans.  I understand that reviews are important for exposure in a lot of cases but I would rather show you to what my listeners say.

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Discuss your experience pertaining live performances, gigs, shows and tours.

I haven’t done very much performing lately EXCEPT last summer.  I ended up back in Tokyo Japan (Japan is a BIG part of my life story.  I’d love to tell it someday) to write, produce, and feature on a project with some longtime friends (they’re really family to me) to be distributed by Sony Music Japan.  Quick shameless plug – Said project should be released this summer (June – August). The group name is Unwork. I actually snuck a few of the songs on my SoundCloud profile but I haven’t told anybody about it.  Ok that’s enough shameless plugging for now. More later!

While I didn’t go to Tokyo to perform, I ended up performing more frequently than ever along with my friends.  We did a few cruise parties on Tokyo Bay. We did a rooftop bar & grill a few times. There were a few others I can’t quite remember due to heavy alcohol consumption (social drinking is a BIG part of Japanese culture).  Oh yea…we OWNED karaoke. We were basically karaoke stars in one area – as in, people from some bars had heard of us before we went to visit them the first time. That was both strange and fun at the same time.

 

Other than last summer, I’d done the usual type of gigs.  The biggest one was a beachfront funk concert in Galveston, TX.  I was part of an R&B duo with my older brother at the time. We were known as Coop DeVille (our last name is Cooper.  Get it? Of course you do…). It was a great experience. The pay was good, too!

 

Also, last summer wasn’t the first time I’d performed in Tokyo.  I did a few venues there back in 2013 after I had released my first solo R&B album.  I was going by the name Trell Blaze back then. More shameless plugging – my old music (both Coop DeVille and Trell Blaze) can still be found under that name in all the same outlets as 47radar.  Yep. Just putting it out there.

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Tell us how you connect with your fans.

I connect with my fans any way possible.  Many of them find me on Instagram or Facebook and reach out to me through messenger.  I also have Twitter for those of you who are interested (@47radAR). My counterparts in the East communicate with me via LINE.

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Discuss the changes in your life as an artist.

My life is ever progressing, ever changing.  I’m trying my hardest to be the best ME that I can possibly be.  The change has been so dramatic that I shed my old name (Trell Blaze) for one that better suited the artist I’ve become.  I used to be so limited – thinking that because I am a black male musician, I HAVE to write and sing R&B songs because that’s what black male musicians do.  What I’ve learned, both as an artist and a person, is that I don’t do well when placed in categories or genres. I no longer think about those things when I create.  It’s exactly where writer’s block comes from. You end up ruling out ideas – not because they’re bad ideas, but because they don’t fit within the box you decided you wanted to create within.

 

That’s been the most notable change in my art.  You’ll definitely “hear” my progression if you listen to Coop DeVille then Trell Blaze then 47radar.  I’m proud of my old music. I think it’s great but I was definitely in a box. Trapped. So much so that I’d actually planned to quit music altogether (as a career, not as a hobby) after I finished my first solo album.  Aren’t you glad I didn’t? No? You wish I would’ve quit? Tough crowd, man…

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State the names of the most important people that boosted your music career and how you met them.
One of my older brothers, Damon.  Half of Coop DeVille. I had never thought of music as a career until I was in Junior High School.  Until then, I didn’t really know exactly what I wanted to do in life. Not to be a braggart, but I had several talents but very little motivation or interest in anything in particular.  However, my brother always wanted to be a singer and he was pursuing his career as an R&B group consisting of some of his friends.

When I learned about song creation and composition, I thought, maybe that would be something I’d like to do.  When my brother learned that I was interested in composing music using electronic instruments (MIDI), he told my mother which synthesizer she should buy me for Christmas that year.  When I got the synth and got my first taste of creating a song (even though it was pretty bad) I was hooked. I had found my thing.

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Explain what you have in mind before considering music as a career.
Right.  As I said earlier, I had several talents coming up in school.  I used to draw at one point. I surprisingly discovered I had a natural knack for watercolor painting.  When I was in kindergarten, they asked what we wanted to be when we grew up during the kindergarten graduation ceremony and I said “Pilot”.  I loved planes and still do. It’s a hidden love of mine that almost nobody knows about. Since I liked healing and helping people, at one point I thought maybe doctor but that didn’t last long.  I’ve been into space travel and the solar system since I was maybe 2 years old – my mother has many stories concerning that! – So at one point I thought astronaut was it. I’m still very much interested in most of the things that I was interested in back then but none of them ran deep enough to give me the motivation I need to pursue them seriously.

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Discuss your experience in life.

I don’t think I’m smart enough to condense this answer down to a size that would fit within acceptable boundaries so I’ll skip it.  You might have to wait for the book. No, that’s not a hint that a book is coming soon but maybe it SHOULD be. Hmm…

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Name the artists that influenced the world.

I’ll name the artists that influenced MY world.  I consider them my music teachers. If you knew how my mind was wired – how I learn things – you’d fully understand why I call them my music teachers.  Stevie Wonder, Whitney Houston, New Edition, Boyz II Men, Take 6, Michael Jackson, Teddy Riley, Otis Redding, Ben E King, Percy Sledge. I’m just going to go ahead and stop here because I could go on for a few decades.  I was exposed to so many eras of music because I would sneak into my mom’s, aunts & uncles, older brothers’ cassette tape and vinyl collections as a kid. I frequently got in trouble for DJ style scratching the vinyl records and doing pitch altering tricks with the cassette tapes.  And thus began my audio engineering career!

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Discuss your moment of rejections as a musician/artist and how you are able to cope and move on with your career.
It’s funny to bring up rejections as the very song we’re discussing here (I Am Love) has been continuously rejected for 2 years now.  Every single exposure entity or blogger or playlister that I’ve submitted it to has rejected it. Outside of this song, I’ve had 10+ songs rejected by Pandora Radio.  In the last 3-4 years, my rejection rate has been about 99%. Call me crazy, but each time I’m rejected I can’t help but wonder what’s wrong with the person rejecting it.

 

I move on by accepting that my music doesn’t connect with them and try to get it to the ears of people it WILL connect with.  There’s always someone out there who wants to hear what you have to say or play. ALWAYS. No matter how bad YOU might THINK it is.  Someone out there wants to hear it. Don’t waste time crying over those who don’t. They don’t have to like your music. It’s their right.  But your music wasn’t created for those who don’t like it. It was created for those who do – and there are those who do. Focus on them. Try your hardest to connect with them.

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Tell us the most negative comment you have ever received.

That I’m wasting my life away by not getting a “real” job and having a wife with a dog and a picket fence and a bank full of money to spend on things like 80 inch TVs and closets full of clothes.

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Elaborate on the song and state the official date of release.

The song has actually been out for 2 years now.  It’s just finally getting traction because one of the few people who didn’t reject it happens to be a YouTuber.  She decided to use the song as her opening and has done so for the last 6 months. As a result, the song has been exposed to many people from many countries and the feedback I’ve gotten has been well beyond what I expected.  I’m just looking for opportunities to spread it even further.

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State your artist’s name and elaborate on it.

47radar kind of evolved on its own.  I started out with the idea of using radAR (the AR being the abbreviation for Arkansas, which is where I was born and raised).  At the same time, for a few years, the number 47 had become sort of symbolic in my personal journey. I would see it a lot in ways that seemed to strange to just be coincidence so I kind of adopted it as my spiritual number.  When I was set to release the song on digital media under radAR, they told me that I couldn’t use the casing in that way. It had to be Radar, without the capital “AR”. This was unacceptable to me and I went back and forth with them for a while.  Then I realized that I had recently created an email account combining the spiritual number and the artist name and asked them if I could just use that instead as a compromise. They accepted and the rest is…well…yea.

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State the title of the song and the meaning.

The song is titled “I Am Love”.  The meaning is basically the answer to a riddle that the song itself proposes throughout the lyrics.

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State the title of the album and the reason for choosing the title.

It’s a standalone song.  It will not be part of any future releases.  However, I do intend to release my latest album sometime this summer.  It will be titled “Transform”. It’s pretty self-explanatory. It depicts a time period of my life where I was experiencing a major transformation of self.  It’s more of a musical journal than an album. I think many people can relate to it on an emotional level.

Published by

Kolade Olamide

I am a poet , writer, beat maker, chef, songwriter, web designer, music promoter,digital marketer, blogger and director.

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